Archive for the ‘British customs’ Category

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Is Britain really panic buying and hoarding?

March 22, 2020

Undoubtedly, as the Coronavirus pandemic bites, some people are panic buying and hoarding. And some are bulk buying with the intention of selling goods on at a profit.

But I suspect the shortages in supermarkets are mostly down to something else.

Over the past 15 years, with the increase in the numbers of supermarkets, the growth in cooked-chilled and convenience foods, and the rise of Just Eat and Deliveroo, most people in the UK have been buying tonight’s meal that day, or ordering in. There’s evidence for this. In 2015 Waitrose published a study, reported in the Guardian, that identified exactly this trend.

Over time the supermarkets have adjusted their supply chains to replenish this little-and-often shopping style. Then suddenly we’re all faced with the possibility of being stuck at home for first seven, then 14 days and today, according to the Sunday Times (£) some of us will be told to stay at home for 12 weeks for our own good. Just imagine what happens when we all start to buy seven or fourteen times what we normally buy each day. Plus while take aways are still available, all those people who would eat in pubs and restaurants now can’t. So they’ve also gone food shopping.

I’m old enough to remember the “weekly shop” when we used to go to the supermarket on the way home on a Friday night and buy enough to make meals and have other products for the entire week. But for most families this is a thing of the past.

As a result the demand on the supermarkets’ supply chains has suddenly and massively increased.

Helen Dickinson, chief executive of the British Retail Consortium, said there was “plenty of food” in the supply chain and that the industry was experiencing “a peak in demand “like Christmas . . . without the four-month build-up period”.

Sunday Times, March 22nd 2020

Then the mass media, and social media, haven’t been shy about publishing photos of empty shelves, encouraging those of us sanguine enough to buy what we need for a few days, to rush out and buy more, just in case it’s not available when we need it. They need to publish more of these:

Well stocked shelves in a British supermarket

Well stocked shelves in a British supermarket

I’m sure it’ll return to normal, eventually. When either we’ve run out of room at home to store food, or we run out of spare cash or hit the limit on our credit cards. Helen Dickinson (quoted above) estimates there’s £1Bn more food in our homes than there was three weeks ago. Surely we can’t store much more without it going off and being thrown away?

And the cost of food will rise, not only because wholesalers sense an opportunity, and because of shortage, but because the BOGOF* and multi-buy offers normally offered by the supermarkets will be stopped for the time being.

I also suspect (but I have no evidence) that given the logistical constraints on distribution, priority is being given to food products in preference to non-food items such as washing powder. So those items will run short too due to both stocking up and reduced distribution. I’ll leave the last word to former Sainsbury’s chief executive Justin King:

“Britain’s food supply chain is under short-term stress, not structural stress,” he said, “Probably 50% of customers are buying twice their usual shop and supermarkets can’t cope with that.”

I hope it all settles down soon, but in the meantime I’ve bought some vegetable seeds which I’ll be planting out over the next few days – well I have lots of time and I’m not supposed to go out unless it’s vital…

*Buy One Get One Free

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Football on UK TV at 3pm? Never!

February 15, 2020

It seems perverse to me that in today’s technology and media landscape, with multi-billion pound fees paid for the rights to broadcast live football (soccer, for my transatlantic readers), it’s impossible to watch a live football match on a Saturday at 3pm in the UK unless you’re actually there in the ground, or have privileged access to a TV studio.

Why is there no live football on TV on Saturday afternoons?

The reason is that in the 1960s then Burnley FC chairman Bob Lord convinced other Football League clubs that if live football were available on TV at 3pm on a Saturday – the kick-off time of most football matches at that time – then their fans would stay at home and watch a higher league team on the telly rather than go to the live game. So a law was enacted that prevented the broadcast of any live match between 2:45 and 5:15 on a Saturday. This law is still in place and still observed, even for games being played outside the UK. Pubs in the UK are also unable to stream live matches between those times.

What’s the impact?

This is the reason so many matches are played on Sunday, Monday nights, Tuesday nights, Friday nights and why one Premier League match each Saturday kicks off at 12:30 (currently broadcast live on BT Sport) and another after the blackout at 5:30 (live on Sky Sports).

It’s also the reason that both the BBC and Sky have prime-time TV slots on a Saturday afternoon broadcasting a studio of football pundits all actually watching the live streams of the matches and then recounting to us mortals, who aren’t allowed to see the live action, what’s going on.

BBC football pundits on Final Score

I believe the one thing it does achieve is a substantial audience for the BBC’s Premier League highlights show, Match of the Day, and to a lesser extent the English Football League (EFL) highlights show currently on Quest.

Could it be fixed?

Of course it could. A simple change of the law to repeal this ludicrous rule would enable broadcasters to carry live football on a Saturday afternoon. Would it do what Bob Lord originally suggested and massively reduce attendance at lower league clubs? I don’t believe so, after all when lower league clubs get their matches broadcast live as part of FA Cup coverage, people still go to the games.

Perhaps we could try it as an experiment and revert if Bob Lord’s apocalyptic prediction comes true? But we’ll never know if we don’t try, because this has never been allowed in the UK – the home of football.

Perverse or what?

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Black Friday – let’s leave it to the US

December 1, 2017

So it seems “Black Friday” has come and gone in the UK without it really stirring anything very much. The Daily Telegraph reports that Currys PC World in Oxford Street opened its doors especially early to let in the rampaging hoardes looking for a bargain – and there was one bloke outside who’d dropped by to pick up his pre-ordered laptop!

It’s no surprise to me. In fact I’m rather pleased that this particular US import isn’t getting much traction over here.

And nor should it.

Picture from The Sun of shoppers fighting over a flat-screen TV

The reason for “black Friday” is that this is how it was referred to by US retailers. The day in question is the Friday after Thanksgiving – which always falls on the last Thursday in November. For many of my American friends Thanksgiving, or “turkey day” as it’s colloquially known, is a much bigger family event than Christmas. The problem for US retailers was that after a day of scoffing Turkey and convivial drinking with their loved ones, most folks booked the Friday as vacation and slept in the next morning. So retailers didn’t sell very much on that particular Friday morning.

Hence it became known as “Black Friday”. Then some bright spark thought of the idea of having a discount sale, but one that ended at midday. So to get the great prices you had to get out of bed and go buy that TV, bike, carpet or whatever else, before lunchtime. I’ve been there on that day (in Boston, MA), and done it. And it’s quite fun, but a lot of people end up buying a lot of stuff they didn’t really want or need just because it was cheap, and the offer was time-limited.

That was it. And of course the UK doesn’t celebrate Thanksgiving, we didn’t have the dip in retail sales on that day, and “black Friday” meant nothing to us.

But the world’s moved on. We can now shop on the internet, so Americans can still sleep in and snap up those bargains without even getting out of bed. And, of course, anyone else in the world with an internet connection can shop from those US retailers. And, with US retailers owning UK chains (IIRC it was Asda, which is owned by WalMart, which originally introduced the concept of Black Friday to the UK some years ago) Black Friday has metamorphosed from a once-a-year, Friday-morning only sale in the USA, to a whole week of discount offers across half the globe.

I’m delighted to see that Marks & Spencer, Fat Face and several other major UK retailers are spurning the Black Friday farce – I believe they’re right when they say all it does is bring higher-price sales during December forward, and reduces the margin on them. It also encourages people to buy stuff they don’t really need. Time magazine suggests that in the US return rate of goods bought on Black Friday is significantly higher than for goods bought at other times of the year. It’s especially so for technology purchases. So the admin and restocking cost for the retailer is higher.

Please Britain, remember Thanksgiving isn’t something we celebrate, so let’s abandon this unnecessary US import.